Illness in modern society is a responsibility relieving state

  • Do you get down when you are ill?
  • Do you get angry with sickness?
  • Do you cast blame when your body is stiff, painful or doing things which you’re sure it shouldn’t?

I’ve just had a few more blessings on my path and am curious if you see them the way I do. I’d love to hear your comments.

As an eternal optimist, I have in recent times become aware that this can be a blessing and a curse. It is great almost all the time as no matter what happens, it allows me to see the good in that moment and balance out any perceived bad leaving me in a place of love and gratitude of whatever is happening. The downside is that being an eternal optimist means that if there’s something that I want to change, I sometimes remain in that behaviour longer than I’d like. (I am, however, also aware of the perfection of life and that if I haven’t changed something yet, it is because I haven’t gained the lessons required to move to the next step in that area.)

Yummo!

Ok, so this isn’t really what I was eating, but it felt like it.

At the end of last week I was feeling a little run down. According to my little sleep cycle tool, I average less than six hours sleep per night and coupled with some work-related stresses, I realised on Friday that I really should stay in bed and give my body a chance to relax and balance. I spent most of the weekend taking things particularly easy and relaxing at home whilst drinking lots of water, honey and lemon and eating predominantly fresh strawberries, kiwi fruit and blueberries.

Being run down is not something I’m used to – this is coming from the Davinator, part man, part machine. I am used to firing on all 13 cylinders most of the time so it was really humbling to slow down and accept it was ok to take some time out.

The wonderful learning of this whole experience is now that it is a new week, I feel that Monday was my last day of being ‘run down’ and as a result I feel very ready to create new routines and get in to some good habits which I know I’d slipped out of. I feel like I’ve had a soft reboot – Ctrl+Alt+Delete.

When I get the honour of emotions or sensations which I am not used to, I truly feel blessed as I know it allows me to relate to even more people which I know my naïve optimism can sometimes cloud me from perceiving.

Next time your health behaves in an unexpected way, treasure it for the message and take appropriate steps to get back on track. Remember in life it is not our ability to stay on track which helps us grow most, it is our speed of recovery to our path which identifies our true colours.

Perhaps choose a miner, look in to his eyes and send him love and hope for the best outcome possible

To illustrate how important being on track is, for those who don’t know, there are currently 33 Chilean miners stuck in a mine over half a kilometre underground.  Drillers are working tirelessly to make a hole big enough to pull them out and as you can imagine there are times when they may not be digging in the ideal spot. As long as they continue to get back on track, they will succeed.

It is now September, they don’t expect to have the miners out till Christmas.

Get back on track!

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